Feeling Good!

Posted by James Eyler on June 29, 2018
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Category: Blog
I’d recently received a request for a full read, contingent upon cutting between 10k–30k words from my 150k word manuscript. Understanding that an unpublished author is already a difficult sell without a 150k story, I took the challenge. I set my target at 20k (midpoint), and after a few weeks of scouring, I hit my target! Well…1,500 words shy, but I have to say, I’m feeling a bit accomplished! 🙂 I can actually think about other aspects of my life now! There were a few things that I discovered when I trudged through my work. There were a lot of shrugs, frowns, and smiles. I use Scrivener, and I love it. Not only does it give me a word count, it also gives me word frequency, which can come in really handy. It wasn’t until I saw exactly how many frowns and smiles there were that I felt a little overwhelmed, and

Whenever Life Gets Busy

Posted by James Eyler on June 13, 2018
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Category: Blog
When life gets busy, we learn where our true priorities lay. Not the priorities we tell people. We say those things to look good in other people’s eyes. I mean our real priorities, the ones deeply seeded in our being that only come out when no one is looking. Recently, my life got really busy. My mother-in-law battled chemo and is now going through radiation therapy. After I graduated college (2014) I founded a charity to help mitigate veteran suicide (whenever people ask me, “What do you do with a degree in philosophy of ethics?”, I tell them, “You found a charity to help others 😉 “). I offer counseling to help prevent people from taking that dark plunge. My spouse recently went back to working for herself again, doing interior design. Between dealing with health issues, deaths in the family, running a charity, helping run an interior design business, rearing

The Working Class Writer

Posted by James Eyler on May 20, 2018
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Category: Blog
The working-class writer: 1) a writer that holds a job and who writes in their spare time; 2) a writer that wants to make a living, writing in their field/genre, but is tied to a job due to such trivialities as food, clothing, and shelter. Both classes of writer face certain difficulties and obstacles, the most prevalent, I feel, is a lack of acknowledged professionalism from our peers, and in ourselves. It is difficult for people, even ourselves, to perceive non-paying work as a job. As such, it is very easy to be dismissive of a writer’s time—an environment ripe for honey do lists. When you tell your spouse that you don’t have time to go shopping, while reading a book, don’t be surprised if another book comes flying at your head. Interestingly enough, said spouse wouldn’t bat an eye if you said that while at your job. It must

Philosophy: Personality

Posted by James Eyler on May 17, 2018
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Category: Blog, Philosophy
Here is a note that I wrote during my Philosophy of Mind class with J. Christopher Maloney at the University of Arizona. We were discussing different philosophical theories of ‘personality’. Personality Personality = what differentiates one person from another, without considering the physical body, i.e., memories, likes, dislikes, morals, beliefs, personal taste, mannerisms, etc. Many people identify their self with their personality, and cannot consider one without the other. When asked to describe one’s identity, they will often use words like “kind” and “religious” and “loyal”—all words that can be used to describe a personality. Personality is the metaphysical aspect of the physical body, both of which make up who we are and how we identify ourselves. If I lost my hands I might feel a part of me was lost that was not just physical. I would no longer be able to enjoy all of the same things that

Professional Adulthood

Posted by James Eyler on May 12, 2018
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Category: Blog
I remember when I used to look at my parents as superheroes. Not only could they do almost anything, they seemed to know almost everything. Now that I’m an adult, I’m thinking to myself, “Self…what the hell?” Some time ago I was driving home with my son and I rolled the window down and rested my arm on the door. Out of the corner of my eye, I saw my son imitate me, even checking to ensure his elbow was at the right angle. That’s when I realized, he was looking at me with the same wonder that I’d worn when I was his age. Somehow, I had become the do anything, know everything adult. I realized, it wasn’t that my parents knew everything, or could do anything, I was just too young to know any better. I was five. What could I really do—read? My perspective was just skewed. But