No Expectations No Frustrations

Posted by James Eyler on August 30, 2018
0
Category: Blog
The best piece of advice I’ve ever received came from my Army chaplain right before I returned home from my first tour of combat in Iraq—no expectations; no frustrations. But after having been involved with the capture of Saddam Hussein (as well as numerous other highly influential missions), not having any expectations was nigh impossible. I felt like I couldn’t NOT have expectations for the glory of our return, and it almost killed me. But, I feel that deserves a bit of a backstory first… I was a reconnaissance specialist in the Army (A Troop 1/10 CAV). The eyes and ears of the Army trained to operate deep behind enemy lines. My unit was the recon unit for 4th ID, and we were very influential during our one year tour. We were initially supposed to have invaded Iraq from Turkey, but politics got in the way and we ended up coming

Writing to Write

Posted by James Eyler on August 28, 2018
0
Category: Blog
While I was perusing my Twitter feed this morning, I read an interesting quote. Something to the effect of, “Novels make money, but short stories teach you how to write.” This reminded me of when I was studying philosophy and would solve the world’s problems one essay at a time. From God to beauty to identifying the Self, there wasn’t a topic I didn’t argue with a voracious appetite. It always started with a simple thought, “What is Beauty?”, and before I knew it I’d written an elaborate argument for my position. My mentors (Dr. Dave Yount and Dr. Jenann Ismael) loved my enthusiasm and attacked my arguments until they were sound. Those little debates quickened my mind and helped me to better understand philosophy. They helped me to form those nebulous ideas into cogent arguments, and the more often I did it, the easier it became to transcribe thought

Where To Write

Posted by James Eyler on August 27, 2018
0
Category: Blog
I recently posted a tweet, asking some well-known authors where they like to write (coffee shops, parks, home, etc.). Margret Ogden, better known as Robin Hobb, responded with “Home. Always. Could never afford to write in coffee shop when starting out. Neither time nor money for it!” My initial thought was, “Me too!” But then the philosopher in me took over and I thought about the significance of her words. Specifically, “No time nor money for it!” My wife and I have been visiting with her mother, helping her to get settled in her new home, and today we’d planned on taking a break to relax at a coffee shop for a bit, after a quick trip to Ross to get me some much needed new shoes. I’d been chomping at the bit to work on my new project while I await a response from a requesting agent. I packed

Paper Over Plastic

Posted by James Eyler on August 17, 2018
0
Category: Blog
Ever wonder how Dungeons & Dragons might save society? Me neither, but I had an epiphany while I was blowing the leaves from my yard today and it came to me in the form of a shameless hashtag: #PaperOverPlastic The message isn’t new—paper is better for the environment than plastic. Paper bags biodegrade and can easily be recycled. Plastic bags take eons to break down (I think there might be some, still floating around from the Big Bang), and they choke fish and other cute (and not so cute) animals. If we want to keep the planet hospitable to human life, we have to cut down on the amount of plastic we use. We all know this, or at least should, and society seems to be on an increasing trend to mitigate the amount of plastic (especially single-use, nonrecyclable) that is used. Yeah, okay…but what does that have to do

What To Do, What To Do

Posted by James Eyler on August 17, 2018
0
Category: Blog
Age of Darkness, the first book in my series War of Ages, began with a map that I had sketched sometime around May 2009. Nine years later (during which I got my bachelors degree and founded a charity) my manuscript is finally at its finished product and off to an agent. It’s been a part of my life for so long that life feels…strangely empty without it to work on. I could always scroll through the pages, nitpicking every tiny nuance. But there really does come point when you have to put the manuscript down and walk away. But…now what? I could take a much needed break. After all, I’ve been working hard. I deserve it! But what should I do with all my newfound free time? It’s times like these that I’m reminded of a meeting I had with one of my professors (a great man by the name