The Working Class Writer

Posted by James Eyler on May 20, 2018
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Category: Blog
The working-class writer: 1) a writer that holds a job and who writes in their spare time; 2) a writer that wants to make a living, writing in their field/genre, but is unfortunately tied to a job due to trivialities such as food, clothing, and shelter. Both classes of writer face certain difficulties and obstacles, the most prevalent, I feel, is a lack of acknowledged professionalism from our peers, and in ourselves. It is difficult for people, even ourselves, to perceive non-paying work as a job. As such, it is very easy to be dismissive of a writer’s time—an environment ripe for honey do lists. When you tell your spouse that you don’t have time to go shopping, while reading a book, don’t be surprised if another book comes flying at your head. Interestingly enough, said spouse wouldn’t bat an eye if you said that while at your job. It

Philosophy: Personality

Posted by James Eyler on May 17, 2018
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Category: Blog, Philosophy
Here is a note that I wrote during my Philosophy of Mind class with J. Christopher Maloney at the University of Arizona. We were discussing different philosophical theories of ‘personality’. Personality Personality = what differentiates one person from another, without considering the physical body, i.e., memories, likes, dislikes, morals, beliefs, personal taste, mannerisms, etc. Many people identify their self with their personality, and cannot consider one without the other. When asked to describe one’s identity, they will often use words like “kind” and “religious” and “loyal”—all words that can be used to describe a personality. Personality is the metaphysical aspect of the physical body, both of which make up who we are and how we identify ourselves. If I lost my hands I might feel a part of me was lost that was not just physical. I would no longer be able to enjoy all of the same things that

Professional Adulthood

Posted by James Eyler on May 12, 2018
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Category: Blog
I remember when I used to look at my parents as superheroes. Not only could they do almost anything, they seemed to know almost everything. Now that I’m an adult, I’m thinking to myself, “Self…what the hell?” Some time ago I was driving home with my son and I rolled the window down and rested my arm on the door. Out of the corner of my eye, I saw my son imitate me, even checking to ensure his elbow was at the right angle. That’s when I realized, he was looking at me with the same wonder that I’d worn when I was his age. Somehow, I had become the do anything, know everything adult. I realized, it wasn’t that my parents knew everything, or could do anything, I was just too young to know any better. I was five. What could I really do—read? My perspective was just skewed. But

Getting Too Caught Up

Posted by James Eyler on May 6, 2018
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Category: Blog
Sometimes I find myself too focused on a single aspect of writing. Specifically revising/cutting/editing my most current manuscript. I feel compelled to focus all my attention on it, and receiving an email from an agent, stating “I like it, just need to tighten it up and bring the word count down” only seems to motivate me to focus on it even more. I sit down, wracking my brain and keyboard, and when I look up, the day has gone. As I rub the kinks in my back and bum, I feel proud of all the work I’ve done. I believe this happens to almost every writer, especially with new projects. Every waking second of free time is focused on that single project, and other projects take a back seat. When I get hyper-focused, my blogging, tweeting, Facebooking, and overall physical activity are very much compromised. You might be thinking, “Damn it, Jim! I’m

So…You Don’t Have A Job? (Part 3)

Posted by James Eyler on April 26, 2018
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Category: Blog
Note: Sorry for the delayed post. I had a sudden loss in the family, as well as a new motivation to focus on my manuscript. *  *   * Aspiring writers face a common challenge that pervades most of society—self-worth. For aspiring writers, becoming published is often the single-most significant milestone. It’s what justifies all of the hard work we’ve put into our craft, all the time spent hidden behind a screen instead of being present with our family and friends, and all the times we’ve had to answer, “Why are you looking at me like that?” Being published is the difference between friends and family telling you that you’re great, and the “professional” writing community telling you that you’re great. At least, that’s how it can feel. I’m sure there is a whole new post-publication stress that we will experience when that day comes, but for now, reaching that milestone can